According to Research … Letter Order in English

Learning to read Hebrew without the vowel points may not be as hard as you think.  Here’s an example from English where the vowels are there, but not necessarily in the proper order, and it’s really not that hard to read.

Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn’t mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

Now, which is easier, the above, or the same below, without most of the vowels:

aCCRDNG T RSRCH aT CMBRDG uNVRSTy, it DSNT MTTR iN WHT oRDR TH LTTRS iN  a WRD aR, TH NLY iMPRTNT  THNG iS THT TH FRST aND LST LTTR Be aT TH RGHT PLC.  TH RST CN Be a TTL MSS aND Yu CN STLL RD iT WiTHoT PRBLM.  THS iS BCuS TH HMN MND DSNT RD eVRY LTTR By iTSLF, BT TH WRD aS a WHL.

In Hebrew, the second paragraph would actually be easy to read, because it’s alphabet is an consonantal alphabet, or “abjad” (see full definition below).  English does rely quite heavily on vowels, and doesn’t have a tri-letter root (“shoresh”) like Hebrew does. Thus in the example above, note how many two and three letter words there are that depend on a vowel or two (to, is, it, the, be, can, but, you) and you can thing of many others (by, on, at, I, me, we, us, …).  In English “it” and “at” would be the same word if we eliminated the vowel.  But in Hebrew, each would be a prefix or a separate three letter consonantal word, which would make it more obvious.

Now, let’s learn a 10-cent word: “abjad”.  According to Wkipedia

An abjad is a type of writing system in which each symbol always or usually stands for a consonant; the reader must supply the appropriate vowel. It is a term suggested by Peter T. Daniels to replace the common terms consonantary or consonantal alphabet or syllabary to refer to the family of scripts called West Semitic. In popular usage, abjads often contain the word “alphabet” in their names, such as “Arabic alphabet” and “Phoenician alphabet”. The name abjad itself derives from the Arabic word for alphabet.
My Hebrew tutorial, “At Home with Hebrew“, allows you to display words with or without the vowels.  There are also a series of lessons that focus on teaching you to read without the vowels.  Newspapers and most printed materials in Israel do NOT include the vowel symbols.
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